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  • It’s time to… sow indoor radishes and tend our winter salad crops

    Posted on January 20th, 2014 charlotte No comments

    The ground outside may be saturated, but Camel CSA’s growers have plenty to do in the polytunnels.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Seasonal local food recipe No.182: Warm halloumi with radish, apple and pecan salad

    Posted on April 5th, 2013 charlotte 1 comment

    It turns out that the latest casualty of the financial crisis in Cyprus may be halloumi cheese. Not withstanding, if you like halloumi this recipe is for you. It uses both the polytunnel-grown radishes and mixed salad in Camel CSA’s veg boxes this week. It’s adapted from a recipe at BBC GoodFood.

    Serves: 4
    Preparation/cooking time: around 30 minutes

    Ingredients
    juice of 1½ limes
    ½ tbsp wholegrain mustard
    ½ tbsp honey
    1½ eating apples, cored and thinly sliced
    1 pear, cored and sliced into matchsticks
    1½ tbsp olive oil
    2 x 250g packs halloumi cheese, each block sliced into three
    150g radishes, thinly sliced
    2 small carrots, peeled and sliced into matchsticks
    50g pecans (or walnuts), roughly chopped
    70g mixed salad leaves

    Method
    To make the dressing, whisk together the lime juice, mustard, honey, oil and some seasoning. Pour half into a large bowl, add the sliced apples and pears, then gently toss everything together so all the fruit is coated. Cover and set aside. The fruit will sit happily now for up to 3 hrs without browning.

    When you’re ready to eat, warm a large frying pan over a medium heat. Season the slices of halloumi with pepper (it doesn’t need any salt as it’s quite a salty cheese), then fry in batches for 2-3 mins on each side until the cheese is golden brown and beginning to crisp. You can keep the halloumi warm in a low oven while you fry the rest.

    At the last minute, scoop the apples and pears out of the dressing (it will have gone watery with the moisture of the fruit, so discard), and layer up on a large platter with the radishes, carrot sticks, pecans or walnuts and mixed salad leaves. Top with the halloumi slices, then drizzle over the remaining dressing.

  • It’s time to… sow radishes and plant more onion sets

    Posted on April 12th, 2012 charlotte No comments

    We’ve been enjoying some ideal growing weather in Cornwall. We had south-west gales and torrential rain on Easter Monday (which sent the tourists scurrying home early) followed by several days of spring showers and warm sunshine.

    So we’ve been hard at work planting hundreds more onion sets and sowing radishes.

    We’ve also planted out bunched spring onions and shallots, spring cabbage and some colourful ruby red and canary yellow leaf beet (perpetual spinach).

  • This week’s share of the harvest

    Posted on July 30th, 2009 charlotte No comments

    Members of Camel Community Supported Agriculture can expect to find up to a dozen freshly-harvested vegetables in their boxes this week.

    Camel CSA 30-07-09The beetroot, onions, radishes, turnips and Swiss chard have been cultivated on our own site at St Kew Highway.

    Camel CSA’s expert growing team are providing the remainder of the box contents from their own plots.

    Mark Norman has grown the courgettes, which feature in Camel CSA’s Recipe No 5 – Courgette frittata, at his site on the outskirts of Bodmin.   He has also supplied the new potatoes, which are Marfona variety.  The British Potato Council says these have an almost “buttery” flavour and a smooth waxy texture.

    Jane and Gav Mellowship are supplying large and small mixed salad bags from their plot on the coast at New Polzeath.

    Jeremy Brown has produced the parsley, spinach and cucumbers on his land behind St Kew Harvest Farm Shop.

    Watch our latest video: Camel CSA – Our first harvest

  • Our veg boxes are tops!

    Posted on July 5th, 2009 charlotte No comments

    We’ve had an enthusiastic response from our members to Camel Community Supported Agriculture’s first vegetable boxes.  This is despite some teething problems with distribution.

    Tony says:

    Our first standard veg box

    Our first standard veg box

    “The box looks fantastic! We’re looking forward to next week’s already.”

    John and Cathy are delighted with the quality:

    “The cucumber which was sweet and fresh and the lettuce and onion we used in a salad.”

    They like the wide and interesting variety of vegetables and have found new ways of using them:

     “The beet greens we cooked almost like a spinach or spring greens and had with fish – better than spinach – along with broad beans and potatoes.

     

    The beets will be roasted and eaten with a lamb casserole with the rest of the onion, turnips and courgettes and we will try your broad bean soup.  Nothing wasted.”

    In the end, both small and standard boxes contained potatoes, broad beans, beetroot, turnip, cucumber and onions.  Standard boxes had a salad pack and small boxes a lollo rosso lettuce.  In addition, standard boxes contained Swiss chard and courgettes.  There wasn’t enough time to pick parsley.

    We have a glut of broad beans, so each box was given an extra £4-worth at shop prices!  We don’t yet have our own poly tunnel, so our three expert growers – Jane, Jeremy and Mark – supplied the salad bags, lettuce, courgettes and cucumber.

    New team

    Camel CSA 03-07-09Grateful thanks to our volunteer picking and packing team of expert grower Mark Norman, Mike H, Penny, Robert and Trish.  Mark says:

    ” It’s great to see some new faces.  I hope the boxes going out means that we’ll see even more volunteers next week.

     

    As first boxes they are excellent.  I hope we can keep the variety going.”

    If you would like to volunteer, either picking and packing or planting and cultivating, just turn up on a Friday or Sunday between 10 a.m. and 12 noon.

    Compost bin

    This Sunday we constructed a compost bin from wooden pallets lashed together with binder twine.  At long last we have somewhere to dump the annual weeds, unwanted plant tops and thinnings.

    Camel CSA 05-07-09A great deal of effort was devoted to the backbreaking job of cutting down the remaining dock leaves to stop them going to seed and spreading all over the site.  We were grateful there were so many of us to share this potentially soul-destroying task!

    We weeded the Swiss chard, carrots and brussels sprouts.  We planted more radishes to replace the ones which had gone to seed in the hot weather.

    A big thank you to expert growers Jane and Mark N and Charlotte, Danny, Ian, Mark M, Mike H, Mike S.

  • Our first veg boxes

    Posted on July 2nd, 2009 charlotte No comments

    Broad beans 28-06-09 - cropped 1We’ve done it – we’re starting to eat our own food! 

    More than 15 Camel Community Supported Agriculture members receive their first vegetable boxes on Friday 3 July. 

    A great deal of human effort has gone into providing these first fruits of our labour.  It’s hard to believe that we only started preparing our site at the beginning of March and sowed the first seeds just a few weeks later.

    Our first share of the harvest will contain: – 

    • broad beans
    • potatoes
    • onions
    • beetroot
    • Swiss chard
    • a bunch of curly or flat-leaved parsley
    • turnips and radishes – possibly
    • green salad

    We’ve grown the first eight items ourselves at St Kew Highway.  The salad leaves are being provided by Jane Mellowship, one of our expert growers, who has her own vegetable plot at New Polzeath.

    Hard work

    CSA weeding 28-06-09 - croppedWe’ve made enormous strides since March – entirely as a result of the dedicated volunteer labour provided by members and expert growers.  Some people said we would never manage it, but we have proved that we can.

    Many hours of hard work have gone into preparing the 40-metre long growing beds, spreading compost, digging up dock leaves, sowing seeds, planting out seedlings, hoeing and an enormous amount of hand weeding.  We’re grateful to our expert growing team and all the volunteers who have turned up on Sunday mornings – rain or shine.

    Last Sunday we thinned out and hand weeded the parsnips, weeded the Swiss chard, spread compost and dug up yet more dock leaves that were threatening to go to seed. 

    A big thanks to expert grower Mark Norman, to members Charlotte, Diana, Mike H and Mike S, and to visitors Donna and Marianne.

    Another team of volunteers will be picking and packing the boxes every Friday morning.  If you’d like to be included on the rota, please contact Mark Norman or phone Antonina at St Kew Harvest. 

    Box collection

     Members must pay for veg boxes in advance.  You’ll be able to collect your box every Friday between noon and 5 p.m. from St Kew Harvest Farm Shop, which is next to the Camel CSA site.  Treasurer Cathy Fairman has been co-ordinating box payment and organisation.  She says:

     

    “Your name will be on your box, please take your own box and anyone else’s that you are delivering.  Remember to give us feedback as soon as possible.

     

    A special thank you to to Penny and Robert Manders and to Mike Haywood for volunteering to help Mark with the first harvest and packing.

     

    Happy eating!”

    Feedback on box content and any queries about veg box administration should be sent to Cathy at thefarm@bodminmoor.co.uk

  • A warm and open welcome

    Posted on June 10th, 2009 charlotte No comments

    Around 60 adults and 20 children joined in the fun at Camel Community Supported Agriculture’s first Open Day and were rewarded with glorious sunshine and not a hint of rain . 

    Visitors ignored the threatening storm clouds and came out in their droves on Open Farm Sunday to see our vegetable growing project in north Cornwall.

    They built bee nests, joined guided tours, planted lettuces and nasturtiums, made scarecrows,  watched a sheep shearing demonstration, sat chatting in the sun and played on hay and straw bales.

    open-day-2009-1Assorted individuals, couples and families travelled from a 30-mile radius to give us some constructive feedback on our efforts to make local food work: –

    Fantastic project.  Amazing!  Brilliant!

    An excellent idea – keep it going

    Great for the whole family.  Liked the things for children to do

    Lovely, interesting day – will come again

    Loved the tour – very inspiring

    Learned a lot about not needing to dig.  Hurrah – compost!

    Need to encourage more people to learn where food comes from and to eat seasonally

    Excellent initiative – more farm events would be great

    We provided a barbeque, home-made-cakes and cold drinks.  Hot drinks and cream teas were available at the farm shop.

     very-hungry-caterpillarIn scenes reminiscent of Eric Carle’s children’s classic The Very Hungry Caterpillar, our guests and helpers munched their way through a  shoulder of organic moorland mutton, a mound of sausages, beefburgers, veggie burgers and vegetable kebabs, several bowls of homegrown salad leaves, radishes and spring onions, 8 slices of rhubarb loaf,  10 rhubarb muffins,  12 slices of coconut sponge, 16 chocolate buns, 24 pieces of lemon drizzle cake, 30 iced cupcakes, 40 flapjacks…

    And the verdict among Camel CSA members? 

    A job very well done! We are so lucky to have a group of such enthusiastic, committed, capable, lovely people

    I think we have all pulled together really well

    We have managed to spread the word to so many people and explain what we’re doing and why we’re doing it

    It was so lovely to see it all coming together and the atmosphere it created

    Most of all we have been able to show that we are a “community” working together

    We can’t wait to be part of this again!